Interval Identification | Intervals of A Second (2 of 10)

When the two notes of an interval are only one letter apart from each other, as with the notes D and E, or B and C, we call that an interval of a second.

An interval of a second is any interval which spans two positions on the staff.

Now, depending upon the amount of half steps separating each note, an interval of a second can be either Major or minor.

Minor Second Intervals

For example, an interval of a minor second occurs when two notes are separated by the distance of only one half step.

Some examples of minor second intervals would include the notes B and C, G# and A, D and Eb, or any other group of two notes which are separated by only one half step.

MinorSecondStaff.png

Major Second Intervals

On the other hand, an interval of a Major second occurs when two notes are separated by the distance of two consecutive half steps, or one whole step.

Some examples of Major second intervals would include the notes F and G, C# and D#, Ab and Bb, or any other group of two notes which are separated by one whole step.

MajorSecondStaff.png

Recognizing intervals of a second on the staff can be relatively simple.

Because they are only one step apart from each other, whether it be a half step for minor second intervals, or a whole step for Major second intervals, intervals of a second on the staff always go from either a line directly to the next space above or below it, or from a space directly to the next line above or below it.

It is up to the performer to determine whether the distance separating each note is a minor second interval, a half step, or a Major second intervals, a whole step.