Interval Identification // Intervals Of A Second (2 of 10)

Run time: 2m 24s  |  Release Date: March 25th, 2020

Section 1 - "Amount of Steps - minor"

When the two notes of an interval are only one letter apart from each other, as with the notes D and E, or B and C, we call that an interval of a second. An interval of a second is any interval which spans two positions on the staff.

Now, depending upon the amount of half steps separating each note, an interval of a second can be either Major or minor. For example, an interval of a minor second occurs when two notes are separated by the distance of only one half step. Some examples of minor second intervals would include the notes B and C, G# and A, D and Eb, or any other group of two notes which are separated by only one half step.

Section 2 - "Amount of Steps - Major"

On the other hand, an interval of a Major second occurs when two notes are separated by the distance of two consecutive half steps, or one whole step. Some examples of Major second intervals would include the notes F and G, C# and D#, Ab and Bb, or any other group of two notes which are separated by one whole step.

Section 3 - "How To Read On The Staff"

Recognizing intervals of a second on the staff can be relatively simple.

Because they are only one step apart from each other, whether it be a half step for minor second intervals, or a whole step for Major second intervals, intervals of a second on the staff always go from either a line directly to the next space above or below it, or from a space directly to the next line above or below it.

It is up to the performer to determine whether the distance separating each note is a minor second interval, a half step, or a Major second intervals, a whole step.

Section 4 - "Wrap Up"

In the next video, we are going to learn about an interval of a third. We will discuss how, like an interval of a second, an interval of a third can also be either Major or minor. Additionally, we will come to understand this interval's role when playing triads in music.

Watch Next:

10c - Intervals (Third).png

Similar to what we learned in the previous video about intervals of a second, an interval of a third can also be either Major or minor depending upon the amount of steps separating each note. For example, an interval of a minor third occurs when two notes are separated by the distance of three consecutive half steps. Now, we know that a whole step is essentially the same as two consecutive half steps.

Therefore, if two half steps equals one whole step, then three consecutive half steps may also be looked at as being comparatively the same as the combination of one whole step and one half step.

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