Mode Construction // Lydian Mode (4 of 7)

Run time: 3m 51s  |  Release Date: September 28th, 2020

Section 1 - "Relation To The Major Scale"

The notes of the Lydian mode may be derived from the fourth scale degree of a corresponding Major scale. In other words, the fourth scale degree of any Major scale may be considered the first scale degree of a Lydian mode. Seeing how the fourth scale degree of a C Major scale is the note F natural, playing all of the notes in the key of C Major from the note F to the next note F one octave above is considered an F Lydian scale.

In the same respect, the fourth scale degree of a G Major scale is the note C. Starting on the note C and playing all of the notes in the key of G Major until the next C one octave above results in a C Lydian scale.

Section 2 - "Similar To Major Scale"

The notes of the Lydian mode are very similar to the notes of an Ionian mode, or Major scale. To change the notes of a Major to that of a Lydian mode, simply raise the fourth scale by one half step. For example, looking at the notes of a C Major scale we can see that the fourth scale degree is the note F. If we raise that note one half step to the note F-sharp we will have change the scale from C Major to C Lydian.

Likewise, if we raise the fourth scale degree of a G Major scale from the note C natural to the note C-sharp we will then be playing a G Lydian scale. Raising the fourth scale degree of any Major scale will resulting in creating the notes of Lydian mode.

Section 3 - "Unique Pattern of Steps"

Similar to the scales discussed in the previous videos, the Lydian mode may also be constructed by following its unique pattern of steps. The pattern of steps above any notes which produces a Lydian mode is whole step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step.

Let's use this pattern of steps to construct an A Phrygian mode. Starting on the note A takes you to the note B. Another whole step above B is the note C-sharp. One more whole step above C-sharp is the note D-sharp. A half step from D-sharp is the note E. The note E to the note F-sharp is a whole step. F-sharp to the note G-sharp is also a whole step. And finally, a half step above G-sharp is the note A.

By following this pattern of steps we will be able to construct a Lydian mode above any given note.

Section 4 - "Wrap Up"

In the next video we are going to discuss the fifth mode in our series, the Mixolydian mode.

Watch Next:

13e - Modes (Mixolydian).png

So far in this video series on modes we learned how each scale degree of a Major scale may be considered the tonic, or first scale degree, if a different Mode. For example, in video two we learned how the Dorian mode can be built off the second scale degree of a Major scale. In video three we discussed how the third scale degree of any Major scale can be the tonic of a Phrygian mode, and most recently in video four, how the Lydian mode can be constructed from any Major scale's fourth scale degree.

Well, in that same respect, the Mixolydian mode may be built off of the fifth scale degree of a corresponding Major scale.

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